Export Statistics
Cambodian Rice Quotes (Updated 16-22, Oct, 2017)
Variety
&
Percentage
Premium 
Jasmine
Rice 
(Rumduol)
Purity 

90%
Wet Season
Jasmine
Rice
(Rumduol)
Purity
>
85%
Wet Season

Fragrant Rice
(Sen Kra Ob)

>

85%
Dry Season

Long Grain White Rice IR
5% 735 725 645 435
10% 730 720 640 430
25% .... .... .... 415
A1 Extra Super .... .... .... ....
A1 Super .... .... ....  

FOB Term US$/Ton Phnom Penh or Sihanouk Ville Port (Min Order 10 Containers) 

Cambodian Premium Red and Organic Rice Quotes ( Update July-Dec 2017 )

Variety
&
Percentage
Organic (Phka Malis) 
Jasmine Rice
= 92%
Wet Season
Organic Brown Jasmine Rice
(Phka Malis)
Purity = 92%
Wet Season
Red Jasmine Rice
(Phka Malis)
Wet Season
5% 1,417 1,260 1,445
10% .... .... ....
25% .... .... .....
A1 Extra Super .... .... .....
A1 Super ..... .... .....

FOB Term US$/Ton Phnom Penh or Sihanouk Ville Port

World Rice Quotes Comparison (Update Oct 16, 2017)

Country
Variety
CAM VIETTHAIINDPAKMY
Jasmine Rice  735 ... ... ...  ...  ... 
Fragrant Rice (SKO) 645 ... ... ...  ...   ...
 White Rice
100% B
 ...  ...  ... ...  ... ... 
 White Rice
5%
 435 ... ... ... ... ...
 White Rice
10%
 430 ... ...  ...  ... ...
 White Rice
15%
425 ...  ...  ... ... ...
 White Rice
25%
 415 ...  ...  ...  ...   ... 
 Parboiled Rice ... ... ... ... ... ...

FOB Term US$/Ton 

Cambodian Rice Exported by Months 2013 to 2017

Monthly20132014201520162017
1. Jan 25,726 21,536 35,921 44,033   48,820
2. Feb 24,089 27,037 37,676 51,912  60,731
3. Mar 45,413 35,757 75,867 66,275  57,127
4. Apr 23,276 35,961 51,719 39,550  45,716
5. May 28,350 27,971 41,842 32,558 45,243 
6. Jun 29,105 29,666 40,800 33,862  30,925
7. Jul 31,411 26,060 28,492 24,087 27,354 
8. Aug 29,358 29,871 29,819 27,799   56,274
9. Sep 29,395 35,511 26,969 41,429  49,776
10. Oct 28,031 35,418 439,06 60,016  
11. Nov 37,855 31,137 48,748 58,168  
12. Dec 46,847 51,136 81,479 62,455   
Yearly
Export
378,856 387,061 538,396 542,144

421,966 

Sources: Mekong Oryza - Cambodia Rice Federation CRF 

Top Countries Imported Cambodian Rice Monthly 2014-2017

Monthly
/Tons
FRAPOLCHINAMALNETBEL
Year 2014 70,077 55,938 48,980 48,120 32,024 18,515
Monthly
/Tons
CHINAFRANETMALPOLUK
Year 2015 116,639 75,257 58,410 54,914 58,410 18,557
Monthly
/Tons
CHINAFRANETMALPOLUK
Year 2016 127,460 78,329 28,690 38,877 64,035 17,673
2017 CHINA FRA NET MAL POL

UK

Jan 18,383 8,230 2,219 529 4,760 2,432
Feb 28,004   7,088 2,960   529  4,376 3,954 
Mar 21,095  5,688   2,471 2,162  3,778   4,285
Apr  13,950  6,842 2,056 2,092  3,789 4,588
May  7,337  5,611  3,217  1,553  6,333 5,363 
Jun  5,951 3,862  1,971  1,265  2,603  647 
Jul 3,032  5,046   2,617  1,613  2,747  917
Aug 11,069  7,066   2,518 5,552  4,496  1,012 
Sep 15,939   4,477 1,234   4.232 2,590   583
Oct            
Nov            
Dec            
12
months
124,760 53,910 21,263 19,527 35,472 23,781

Sources: Mekong Oryza 

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Government directs support to rice farmers
Posted: Aug 15, 2017

The government announced yesterday that it would “intervene” to support the price that farmers receive for their paddy rice, though without instituting a price floor or direct subsidies that would jeopardise a free market.

Vongsey Vissoth, secretary of state at the Ministry of Economy and Finance (MEF), told representatives of the private sector and agricultural cooperatives that the government would take action to prop up the price that local rice farmers receive for their harvest.

He said even though Cambodian farm-gate prices on paddy rice were cheaper than those of neighbouring countries, the price that farmers actually received for the paddy was very low. Moreover, the market price tends to drop off just ahead of the harvest, pressuring desperate farmers to sell their paddy at a slim margin.

“Whenever the harvest season is approaching the price of paddy rice always slumps,” he said.

Chan Sophal, executive secretary of Farmers and Water Net, a Kampong Thom-based agricultural NGO, said rice was a challenging sector for farmers, even when they followed the government’s guidelines on cultivation.

“We cannot understand why local rice millers reject to buy our paddy rice from us, while brokers are ready to buy it,” she said, adding that the brokers are able to purchase the paddy at a lower price because local millers reject to buy it.

Cambodia produced about 5 million tonnes of surplus paddy rice last year, with an estimated 3 million tonnes exported through informal channels.

Vissoth said poor infrastructure and high transport costs resulted in a high mark-up on rice paddy, though hinted that “price-makers” – including millers, brokers and traders – could be “playing with prices” to take higher profits at the farmer’s expense.

He said the government has already approved a $50 million package of low-interest loans to rice millers for purchasing rice paddy and has earmarked an additional $30 million to provide loans to millers for the construction of storage and drying facilities. The measures support Cambodian rice millers and exporters so that they can offer better prices to local farmers, he noted, but now the government will focus on supporting the farmers themselves.

As part of a new initiative, the government will act as an intermediary in negotiating rice prices and will facilitate transport to help farmers lower their logistics costs.

“Provincial governors and authorities will actively intervene in the market failure,” he said. “Authorities will be responsible for keeping tabs on price-makers to ensure that the price they offer is fair to farmers, and also to provide assistance in transportation, building new infrastructure and preventing unofficial fees from being charged on transport.”

Vissoth said provincial authorities could dip into the provincial budget to provide these facilities to farmers, and should also provide free transport to help farmers get their rice paddy to local buyers or markets.

“This is a short-term intervention in order to stabilise prices for farmers,” he said. “The policy will put pressure on price-makers to raise the prices they offer farmers.”

Song Saran, CEO of rice miller and exporter Amru Rice, said he welcomed the government’s announcement as it would address some of the factors that were depressing rice prices.

“It is the right direction to address the real issues of the sector to prevent a market failure,” he said, adding that reducing transport costs would improve margins.

“We [millers] cannot control the price of paddy rice as it is based on the market’s supply and demand,” he added.

By Cheng Sokhorng, The Phnom Penh Post 

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